Alice in Wonderland

At the top of the staircase which leads to C soco, you can hear the sound of hushed voices. As you pass through the double, ply-wood doors it resolves into conversation, half-casual and half-theatrical. It is the cast. Someone has realised that this show, without scenery and scanty on props, is swamped in the frankly enormous dilapidated room, and has dispersed the performers to fill the space. Now, in awkward, scattered groups, they create a loose sort of atmosphere with barely audible chatter.The audience too is rather lost, with some seventy seats in a venue which could seat hundreds. The performers make a noble effort to turn this into an immersive piece, crawling through the audience and shouting from behind them. Apart, however, from one battle scene, in which the zombie army of the Black Queen approaches the defiant Red forces from all corners of the room, they do not succeed in turning the space to their advantage.Anyone familiar with the works of the Revd. Dodgson will have noticed that last sentence with interest. I do not know why the piece contained zombies either. Or a Black Queen. Or, for that matter, a groundless and rather vapid romance between Alice and the White Rabbit, whose only attraction, apart from being the secret general of the Red Queen’s army, seems to have been his long hair and his ability to skateboard across the stage. To invigorate this new piece, it seems to have been necessary to make the Hatter a transvestite, and set the whole thing in a museum, with the overall, unexplored, unexplained implication that Alice, a convent schoolgirl with a restrictive teacher, is in some way delusional, on account of the malign influence of her cat.Apart from the names, the only real concession to Carroll is an irrelevant, wholesale quotation of The Walrus and the Carpenter. While the original Alice never got the best lines in her dialogue, this Alice is forced to deliver the most outrageously corny phrases, especially when the lights go out, such that one feels positively sorry for the poor actress, who cannot inject them with any life.The sensation is of watching an A-level devised piece, not yet finished, and which for some reason included the teachers amongst the cast. In all, an unsatisfactory and thoroughly confusing experience at ten in the morning.

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

Performances

The Blurb

Mad Hatters, Cheshire Cats, White Rabbits... can only mean one thing: Alice has returned to Wonderland. But did she ever really leave? New adaptation of Lewis Caroll's classic.

Most Popular See More

Wicked

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Book of Mormon

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Mamma Mia!

From £18.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Dear Evan Hansen

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

My Fair Lady

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

SIX

From £21.00

More Info

Find Tickets