AKA MissD

Roughly halfway through her show, Miss D asks us- “So, has anyone else had Chemical Weapons training?”. For an hour, throwaway comments about life in Israel come out in much the same way- great fistfuls of anecdotes from a life shockingly foreign to our drizzly city are passed off as just another day of compulsory military service. Daphna Baram (AKA Miss D) is an Israeli, and acknowledges the elephant in the room before rugby tackling it to the ground and joking it into submission.

Daphna Baram (AKA Miss D) is an Israeli, and acknowledges the elephant in the room before rugby tackling it to the ground and joking it into submission.

In amongst the apologies on behalf of everyone involved are stories about Baram's own personal part in the Israel-Gaza conflict, from human rights lawyer (with largely Palestinian clients) to the gigging London-based comedian we see before us, and all in a way that tickles the funny-bone without ever being dismissive. This casual, conversational delivery, which we might expect around a discussion of her London home or the perils of online dating, brings certain parts of the conflict closer to home, making this not only a wonderful and hilarious performance, but an important one.

While your average comedian will moan about that horrible first date or bemoan their toaster, Baram will tell you how to survive a heart attack, then recount the time her state-issued gun was confiscated for her own safety. The more familiar aspects of life, too, from the impossibilities of dating to the effects of age and the experience of the Festival, are approached with the same warmth and unflappable humour. It's hard to find fault in Baram's performance, and even when the shock value is gone, we are drawn in by her quick wit and fearless storytelling. Baram's famed alter ego Miss D still forces her to do the mad, the bad, and the very inadvisable, and it is with great presence and timing that she tells us about them all, regardless of any political intrigue.

Reviews by Jenni Ajderian

Just The Tonic at the Caves

Afternoon Delight

★★★
Citrus Club

Gower Rangers

★★★
Southsider

An Introduction to Twerking

★★★★
Stand in the Square

Keep the Kids Out!

★★★★
Sweet Grassmarket

The Universal Recipe

★★★★

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £600,000 to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

Performances

Location

The Blurb

Enjoy your first heart attack, dress for a suicide bombing, respond when your date wants to clean your house in the nude. Why is it hard to take one human life with an Uzi? Who is the most difficult client for a human rights lawyer? What to do when your brain screams ‘get out’ but your alter-ego is already in it up to her tits? Daphna Baram, an Israeli comedian, lawyer, journalist, cardiac patient, and lifestyle guru tells it like it is. 'A rollicking show' (HuffingtonPost.co.uk). 'Loud and vivacious' (ThreeWeeks).

Most Popular See More

The Lion King

From £36.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Anything Goes

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Wicked

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Play That Goes Wrong

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Come From Away

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Matilda the Musical

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets