Ahir Shah: Anatomy

Mind-blowingly brilliant, Shah’s sheer intelligence is astounding. Anatomy oozes wonderful, beautiful, almost poetic language and boasts subject-matter so varied and ambitious that it is simply hard to believe the comedian standing in front of you is just twenty-two years old. His vocabulary alone amazes, as Shah is blessed with a command of the English language which leads to addictive listening- somewhat reminiscent of Stephen Fry and Russell Brand; it is, in ways, quite inspiring.

Shah flits effortlessly between discussion of religion, philosophy and self-identity, facial hair, adolescence and sex. His ability to infuse the grand and abstract with the silly and literal is unparalleled. We hear of the ‘hipster Al-Qaida’, a splinter group of gay terrorists and, moments later, are offered statements such as ‘spontaneity is a necessary condition of truth’. This is undoubtedly a comedian I could listen to for hours.

What is perhaps most innovative and interesting is Shah’s two levels of narration as he simultaneously tells his jokes and offers a kind of commentary on his show, and stand-up as a whole. He conjures two separate strands and therefore manages to deliver a quite fascinating discussion of the comedic art form alongside his performance. ‘Not having a microphone decontextualises stand-up comedy’.

This is one of the most incredibly articulate and overtly intelligent comedians I have had the pleasure of watching and I would strongly recommend you go and check him out: a bright young man, full of exceptional potential and fascinating opinions.

Since you’re here…

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Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
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Performances

The Blurb

Using the medium of funny amplified jokes, Anatomy will be an hour of precise, lucid, exacting stand-up comedy about the body, the mind and - well, y'know, that sort of thing (probably). ‘Intellectualism and profanity’ **** (ThreeWeeks).

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