After the Rainfall

Ants successfully colonised the world; Britain didn’t. This is a story about Empire, those that rise, those that crumble and those, like ants, that perpetuate through space and time. More than this, After the Rainfall is a story about communication; the complex, coordinated and often conflicting ways in which an idea is passed from one person to another, and the monumental impact such ideas can have on a generation.

The play starts with the world’s greatest architects... no not the Egyptians, although this play is inextricably linked with the plight of Egypt since post-WWII, but ants. A species who, by the way, live in such complete communal compliance that communication doesn’t exist, they just ‘do.’ And this theatre company, curious directive, just ‘do’ too. At times the cast appear almost ant-like in their execution and selfless dedication to the creation of something that is much larger than themselves. There are certainly no egos here and the effect is mesmerising as prop, scenery and player combine in a myriad of ways to create one of the most dynamic theatrical spaces I have ever seen. A Hollywood conspiracy theory film would struggle to tie all of these loose threads and flailing time lines together. The acting was occasionally guilty of being a touch over-indulgent and stereotyped with each actor ensuring that each of their serious roles, were performed very seriously indeed. However, this is probably necessary when such a multitude of characters grace the stage, interlocking and interconnecting in such a way that will leave you wondering where the other dozen are when only six appear for the bow at the end. This was a highly accomplished, thought provoking performance and director Jack Lowe and devisers alike, should receive all the acclaim they deserve.

Since you’re here…

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You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
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Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
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Acting For Others
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The Blurb

Navigating the arid Egyptian desert, continental Europe, the British Museum and a quiet village green, Fringe First winners 2011 excavate the aftermath of Empire. Multimedia and movement unravel artefacts, mining and our connection to ants. www.curiousdirective.com. @c_directive.

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