Adam Page

Pressing the right pedal records, pressing the left pedal replays. This is the basic mechanism on which Adam Page’s show hinges and it’s remarkable what he can do with something ostensibly so simple.

No two shows are alike, since everything we hear is improvised. Page tells us this at the start of the gig, and he soon proves he’s too good an instrumentalist for it to be hot air. It’s not that he’s learned enough to record the five second stints that are used in the pieces he shows us. He is an accomplished flautist, saxophonist, beat-boxer, guitarist and keyboardist. He has an intuitive knowledge of how to bind all the different components together to compose a complex and imaginative weave of funk. As the piece progresses, he drops sounds away and adds new ones, giving it a lifecycle, an arc of development that turns it from a tune into a song. Page’s timing is impeccable. He knows exactly when to adjust his sound, and all the while denies the possibility of oversaturation.

He is particularly adept at the saxophone, with which he says he connects the most. In the only instant of the premeditated, Page plays his own rendition of ‘High and Dry’ by Radiohead. The lights dim and we are drawn into something that means a lot to him. It is not only an affecting rendition, but it gives the show nuance, proof of his ability to keep the audience hooked as he moves from the silly to the heartfelt: ‘I really love going to that place. The whole world goes for five minutes. Thanks for letting me go there,’ he says.

Page tells us that the clown in him makes the silly stuff easy, but even the silly is a demonstration of musical aptitude and witty showmanship. He composes a melody using only his beard, and another using his water bottle. He goes on to make entire pieces using only the name of an audience member or three genres given to him by people in the crowd. He makes everything look and sound so much easier than it is, but if there’s one thing Adam Page proves, it’s that there’s nothing silly about making a music with the unconventional.

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £600,000 to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
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Performances

The Blurb

Multi-instrumentalist Adam Page returns to the Fringe with his award winning solo show. Looping vocals, beatboxing and an array of instruments ... including his beard, every audience member will feel a part of this interactive feel-good show.

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