A Little Piece of Heaven

It’s a shame “A Little Piece of Heaven” isn’t billed as a thriller, because it is most certainly horrifying. The rock musical follows Shanie (Angelica Hughes), a thirteen year-old who decides that a conspiracy organization known as New World Order is trying to take over the globe. Using various forms of social media, Shanie creates a group called ‘heaven’, which is dedicated to stopping New World Order. At the start of the 2012 London Olympics she and 14 other teenagers from ‘heaven’ camp out in Shanie’s house, in preparation for the New World Order takeover.

What ensues vaguely resembles Lord of the Flies set to mediocre music. Teenagers are branded, kidnapped, and even reenact the Jonestown mass suicide (while photographs from the real mass suicide float across a screen in the background). This might, possibly, have been excusable had the whole pulled into a coherent show with meaning and some semblance of a salient point, but it does not. The plot is full of holes, never explaining, for example, how fourteen children camped out in a house are helping to fight New World Order, or what the police and parents are doing while a girl is kidnapped and videos of children getting branded are supposedly going viral. The ending, when it comes (eventually), is completely anticlimactic and does nothing to tie up any of the loose ends that formed throughout the show.

In order to make this musical even remotely worth sitting through, the cast would have had to consist of unbelievably talented actors who are also incredible vocalists. Instead it consisted of teenagers. Capable teenagers, but teenagers nonetheless. Their acting was well executed and their singing, if not fantastic, was good. Their only major flaw was a tendency to speak too softly to be heard and to talk over their fellow actors.

In one of the only impressive aspects of the play, a good number of the actors played their own instruments. These musicians were all talented, and Matthew Crowe - who plays Tim, Shanie’s second-in-command - was especially noteworthy, as he narrated and sang all while skillfully playing the keyboard. Tilly Needham, who plays Martha, is also worth keeping an eye out for in the future, as she is a highly accomplished singer.

Although the group of actors played their parts admirably, they were not nearly talented enough to make up for the negative aspects of the show. I found myself wishing that New World Order had taken over at the opening ceremony of the Olympics as Shanie predicted. That way the show would have ended after fifteen minutes, instead of dragging on for seventy-five.

Reviews by Margaret Sessa-Hawkins

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

Performances

The Blurb

Shanie's conspiracy theories have made her an internet legend - impressive for a timid, unpopular 13-year-old schoolgirl. Duckegg Theatre Company presents a brand new rock musical exploring the dangers of being a sheep. **** (BroadwayBaby.com, 2011).

Most Popular See More

Dear Evan Hansen

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Tina - The Tina Turner Musical

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Mamma Mia!

From £18.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Mary Poppins

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

SIX

From £21.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Phantom of the Opera

From £27.00

More Info

Find Tickets