A Fistful of Hunny

If you go to see one show this year at the Fringe, make it A Fistful of Hunny. This outrageously horrific appropriation of one of my fondest childhood memories made me laugh until I couldn’t breathe and then in an instant had me biting my fingernails and clutching my seat in a tense ball of nerves. By the looks of things in the theatre, the same went for everyone else; there were jaws dropped, eyes widened and nervous smiles all round.

Think back to your childhood memories, because they’re all going to go tits up in the most fun, exciting and hilarious way.

Did you ever think what might have happened to the animals of the Hundred Acre Wood when Christopher Robin did eventually grow up? Did it ever cross your mind that he may have abandoned his little friends for the big, wide corporate world of capitalism, only to leave them waiting on that bridge, at the very edge of the page for the day he may return? Reunions can be tough at the best of times, but when there’s an angry tiger, a clever plan and a hunny pot, things may get a little bit sticky.

This show, the love child of Quentin Tarantino and A. A. Milne, is so clever that not even Walt Disney could find a fault or plot hole. Selling out on their opening night, writers and directors Reece Connolly and Aidan Peppin are theatre-making superheros and their talent is one to be watched with a very close eye. They should be immensely proud of their beautifully written story -or rather their rather dark, intense, horrific, terrifyingly funny and strangely heartwarming story. You won’t find darker humour if you looked for it in the deepest, darkest depths of Disney’s pre-1950’s archives.

From one extreme to another, you’ll be weeping with laughter at the references made in the disgustingly intelligent script, the nervously laughing as you try to get your head around the animal’s meticulous plan before the inevitable tears that will follow as it all goes to shit. What amazes me is that the play still manages to get a few more laughs in the darkest of moments.

The cast bring the uncomfortably charming writing to life and managed to keep their energy levels high for what is an intense performance making every moment a joy to watch. Meg Hodgson is mesmerising, as is Chloe Borthwick, as they never stop performing; reactions and little traits reveal the realities of the well-known characters, making the plot sink into place when we realise that these characters are indeed pretty fucked up. Much in the same way, Luke Higgins, Brendan Jackson and Christy Connorton are terrifying in the most delightful way - they carry the story with their presence, energy and commitment to their roles.

All round, this show does not disappoint. Think back to your childhood memories, because they’re all going to go tits up in the most fun, exciting and hilarious way. 

Reviews by Becca Topping

theSpace @ Venue45

ACOrN: A Crunch or None

★★★★
theSpace @ Venue45

A Fistful of Hunny

★★★★★
theSpace @ Venue45

D.I.M.

★★★★

Performances

Location

The Blurb

Christopher’s childhood animal friends are back. They’ve brought threats, baseball bats, and an offshore bank account ready to be wired millions. They’re jealous. Pissed-off. Christopher owes them, and tonight’s the night when the Pooh hits the fan. Screw the wood. This lot are dreaming of a hundred acre island. A Fistful of Hunny is a dark, frenzied comedy about kidnapping, blackmail, extortion and heffalumps.