6.0: How Heap And Pebble Took On The World And Won

Dancing Brick are a company that have done well at the Fringe over the years. From their pre-formation when co-founder Thomas Eccleshare was astounding audiences as Banquo in a physical version of Macbeth in 2005, and their first Fringe show under the banner of Dancing Brick in 2006, they’ve received critical praise for their particular brand of immersive theatre.So here they are again at the Fringe with their show 6.0, a tale that imagines post-global warming future in which there is no ice. A problem that the greatest ice dancers the world has ever seen address by doing their routine on a wooden floor. And before you start thinking that’s a bit of an absurd idea – do ice machines not work? – absurd is the style of this brand of comedy. Heap Krusiak (Thomas Eccleshare) and Pebble Adverati (Valentina Ceschi) mix movement with audience interaction and a wonderful economy of words to create a quite unique experience. There are clear influences of their Jacque Lecoq training, even down to the ultimate ‘mask’, the clown’s red nose. There are brave periods of silence, and whilst that has been used to great effect in their previous work, this is a funnier piece and it makes the peaks and troughs of comedy to physical theatre pretty steep mountains to climb. I’ve also seen what Eccleshare is capable of, and putting him in a pair of ice skates on a wooden floor hampers his gracefulness, like an opera singer chewing gum. But when it’s funny, it’s intensely funny, with ideas employed that I’ve never seen used elsewhere.But those concerns aside, in a programme stuffed with student impro comedy, it’s still a brilliantly inventive piece that gives audiences something original to look at.

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The Blurb

Dancing Brick’s world premiere 6.0: How Heap and Pebble took on the World and Won is the hilarious and poignant story of Heap Krusiak and Pebble Adverati, the greatest ice dance pair the world has ever known, confronted by a world that has run out of ice. They have come to Edinburgh to take on the doubters, to take on the world: to attempt to perform their free dance here tonight, in a theatre, on a wooden floor.

One of the ‘Picks of the Pleasance’ at this year’s Latitude Festival, 6.0: How Heap and Pebble Took on the World and Won beautifully explores how humans cope in an environment that fails to provide them with what they need. It is about loss, and our ability to cope with that loss, both on a human and a global, environmental scale. It is a climate change parable, about the creativity that comes from the challenge of an altered landscape; about how we find ways to adapt, to create, to continue.

Developed at BAC as a Scratch Commission, 6.0: How Heap and Pebble Took on the World and Won holds the sportsman up as an example to us all of someone who constantly pursues perfection, who never gives up, who tries to achieve the impossible. It is about the relationship sport has to theatre, how close the two types of performance are, how sport, like art, is a human impulse towards beauty.

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