Agamemnon by Steven Berkoff

Agamemnon by Steven Berkoff

This production does physical theatre well, which already puts it ahead of a lot of other Fringe shows. It also makes a very good job of updating and contextualising the Aeschylus play upon which it is based so that a modern audience can understand the proper implications of what's actually going on... 

The Tragedy of Titus

The Tragedy of Titus

Unlike some Shakespeare adaptations doing the rounds, this slimmed-down Titus Andronicus is surprisingly well-cut. Clipping the Bard's most adolescent play to less than an hour like this does take out some of its tragic sweep and grandeur, but what's left behind is coherent and has all limbs intact, rather unlike its characters... 

Mr Kolpert

Mr Kolpert

This production is very clever in some respects, and surprisingly dense in others. The action consists of a dinner party where the two bored hosts set out to confuse and distress their pair of guests as much as possible, like wind-up merchants on cocaine... 

Story Shakespeare: Love's Labour's Lost

Story Shakespeare: Love's Labour's Lost

Anybody who thinks that you can perform Love's Labour's Lost without doing something serious to the script probably hasn't read the play. Though it still has great moments and some good jokes, huge amounts of it just don't make sense without an extensive background in Elizabethan scholarly humour... 

The Tempest

The Tempest

If you’re going to combine theatre with acrobatics, you really need to be good at both. Backhand Theatre are good at acrobatics.The storm sequence (though if you don’t know the play you might not guess that’s what it is) which opens the play is exciting and atmospheric, though I don’t see any good reason why it couldn’t have been combined with the text from the first scene... 

3 Comics to Midnight

3 Comics to Midnight

I went to this show on a thrifty whim, with the usual mixture of excitement and premature regret that comes with seeing free things. But, my darling readers, you can scratch the latter and amp up the former, because after seeing these promising three, regret was the last thing on my mind... 

Orpheus

Orpheus

To quite a large extent this is exactly the play you would expect bright young private school Londoners to bring to the Fringe. It's technically proficient, has a decent aesthetic and intellectual grounding, but is difficult to relate to and outstays its welcome... 

The Games

The Games

The Games at Zoo Roxy (I mention the venue for your convenience as I fully expect you to go within 24hrs of reading this) masquerades as an unearthed Aristophanes play, but shares as much with panto as it does with the grand-daddy of dick jokes himself... 

Bepo & Co

Bepo & Co

Bepo & Co.'s core conceit is that its band of six circus performers have lived through the past century, with all its wars and massacres and triumphs, without ageing a day. The characters have the energy and enthusiasm of youth combined with the experience and skill of age, which enables them to share their extraordinary story with their audience... 

Oedipus by Steven Berkoff (After Sophocles)

Oedipus by Steven Berkoff (After Sophocles)

This interpretation of Sophocles' much-repeated tale of incest and murder isn't as radical a departure from the original as I was expecting, given the hijacked authorship of the title... 

3D Hamlet: A Lost Generation

3D Hamlet: A Lost Generation

I wanted to give this a one-word review, but Broadway Baby reviews can’t contain profanity and I have to do everything I can to make sure nobody wastes their money on this.It’s marketed as 3D – it isn’t... 

Hotel Medea

Hotel Medea

If I asked you to spend the six hours between midnight and dawn attending a participatory, promenade reinterpretation of a Greek myth, many of you would find an excuse not to. Admittedly, Hotel Medea is a challenge to your commitment as an audience member, but a challenge infinitely worth undertaking, and immensely rewarding once you do... 

The Man of Mode

The Man of Mode

Restoration comedies need restoring, and, contrary to what their name might imply, Braindead Theatre Company have made some very intelligent choices here. Judicious cuts have trimmed the production to a tight hour without doing much damage to Etheridge's plot or the sharp wit of his English... 

Chasing Dragons

Chasing Dragons

The show starts (after a song) with 'once upon a time' and ends with 'happily ever after', which is pretty indicative of the standard of writing on display. Sandwiched between these stalest of loaf-ends is the marginally more inventive story of a mentally ill fantasy writer losing his grip on reality in favour of the universe he has created...