The Trial

The Trial

Kafka’s existential nightmare becomes a short, sharp physical theatre piece from Lecoq-trained On Your Feet theatre. Everyman banker Josef K is suddenly arrested by mysterious authorities for an unspecified crime, with murky consequences that are as unexpected as they are incomprehensible... 

The Mikado

The Mikado

Boasting some wonderful singing, this bright and breezy adaptation of Gilbert and Sullivan’s classic brings little that is fresh to the show, but captures much of the sense of fun that makes it such a popular piece to watch... 

Richard Tyrone Jones's Big Heart

Richard Tyrone Jones's Big Heart

Two years ago Richard Tyrone Jones a healthy, gym-going, performance poet was diagnosed with chronic heart failure on the eve of his thirtieth birthday. As he complains, ‘I couldn’t get a job (I had heart failure!), I couldn’t get a girlfriend (I had heart failure!), and I couldn’t even get the title of my first one man show... 

The Sidcup Family Portrait

The Sidcup Family Portrait

Alternative theatre doesn’t get more frantic than this irreverent ancestral comedy from Caligula’s Alibi Theatre Company. When rich kids Jonty, Stella and Wilbur Sidcup discover they have spent their family fortune, eldest son Jonty journeys back in time through the family’s history to ask his forefathers to lend him some cash... 

The Ring of Stones

The Ring of Stones

The Fringe may not be the most obvious place for epic musicals, but with a cast of twenty-two, Ring of Stones succeeds in being the exception that proves big shows can work. A tale of the brave villagers of Eyam who chose to selflessly quarantine themselves - ‘nobody in and nobody out’ - when plague struck in 1665, writers Eddie Brierly and Peter Robinson have crafted a mini Les Miserables for the fringe, replete with soaring ballads and a cast brimming with passion... 

The Wind in the Willows

The Wind in the Willows

AA Milne’s ‘Toad of Toad Hall’, amongst other adaptations, shows Kenneth Grahame’s children’s classic lends itself well to theatrical performance, but this new children’s musical, while brimming with energy in its adventures of Mole, Rat, and Mister Toad, leaves an odd taste in the mouth... 

Fukushima - A Silent Prayer of Poetry

Fukushima - A Silent Prayer of Poetry

In the days and weeks after the disaster at the Fukushima nuclear power plant last spring, local poet Ryoichi Wago published his thoughts and fears through twitter, reflecting the feelings of a people at the time devastated by the ‘sea of rubble’ the tsunami laid in its wake... 

The Disintegration Loops

The Disintegration Loops

With a vision of contemporary life viewed through the broken prism of Greek tragedy and commedia dell’arte, this beguiling theatre piece is a brief but dizzy ride that will stay with you for hours afterwards, even if you don’t quite know why... 

The Loves I Haven't Known

The Loves I Haven't Known

Chris Bush and Ian McCluskey have both been down on their luck in love, or so they tell us when they say this is a ‘true story based on things that might not have happened.’ This gem of a show charts their unrequited loves, the ones who got away, all the way to the ones who disagree with their choice of kebab topping at 3am outside a sticky Doncaster nightclub... 

Bereavement: the Musical

Bereavement: the Musical

Woody Allen’s words that “it is impossible to experience one’s death objectively and still carry a tune,” leapt into my head after Bereavement: the Musical. A song cycle that claims to be an all-singing, all-dancing musical about loss, composer Jeff Carpenter and writer Mairin O’Hagan, who lost parents in their teens, use their own experiences to give life to characters feeling grief of their own, although some more successfully than others... 

Blink

Blink

‘Love is whatever you feel it to be’, says Jonah (Harry McEntire) at the start of this quirky romance by playwright Phil Porter. Shortly after the death of her father, still-grieving Sophie loses her job at a software developer, made redundant due to her apparent ‘lack of visibility... 

Pinch in Love

Pinch in Love

The poster tagline to Pinch in Love is ‘However appetising the baby may look, the answer is no to cooking it!’ It’s a sinister slogan that promises a darkly comic play full of humour, but alas... 

B*tch Boxer

B*tch Boxer

With Nicola Adams’ recent boxing success at the London Olympics, this blistering play about women’s boxing couldn’t have come at a less pertinent time. As part of the Old Vic New Voices scheme, in which young emerging writers are given the chance to take their work to the fringe, writer/performer Charlotte Josephine’s play explores one feisty young woman’s fight in a male-dominated environment... 

Doll

Doll

A strange mixture of Frankenstein, Pygmalion, and softcore erotica lies at the heart of this debacle of a play from Inverness playwright Liam McCormick. At the age of 18, Ethan falls for a sex doll or, as he calls it, a ‘love doll’, called Monica, the ‘only woman I’ve met with a soul’... 

Mother Tongue

Mother Tongue

The struggle of one woman to become a mother is the painful, but ultimately uplifting subject of this touchingly honest autobiographical study from Californian performance artist, Jillian Lauren... 

Werther's Sorrows

Werther's Sorrows

A modern day retelling of The Sorrows of Young Werther manages to lose the drama and vitality of Goethe’s work in this muddled adaptation by Time Zone Theatre Company. 18-year-old German Werther eschews study and arrives in London to begin travelling the world at the start of his gap year... 

Do You Still Throw Spears at Each Other? - Free

Do You Still Throw Spears at Each Other? - Free

Prince Philip supposedly coined the word ‘dontopedology’ in describing his talent for ‘opening one’s mouth and putting one’s foot in it’, and in this free show at Espionage, George Telfer takes us through some of his gems in a broadly entertaining forty-five minute monologue that was as much an accomplished comic performance as impression... 

Salome

Salome

In this play, a young princess is besotted by a seemingly deranged prophet, but his rejections spurn her to a devastating final act in this minimalist, if overly simple, adaptation of Oscar Wilde’s religious tragedy... 

The Economist

The Economist

Any piece of theatre that deals with tragic recent history is likely to divide audiences, and this challenging play that gives a version of the events that led to the massacre by Anders Breivik in Norway is hardly different...