Thirty Two Teeth

Thirty Two Teeth

JamJar’s follow up to Following Wendy is a disappointment on the scale of Grease 2, The Matrix Reloaded and Godfather 3 combined. In a nutshell, self-confessed miracle boy Samuel has learnt how to barter life favours with the tooth fairy... 

Malfi

Malfi

The spirit of John Webster has never been better captured than in the rat-jabbing guttersnipe seen in Shakespeare in Love. This is a fact we all know to be true. And although Offshoots Theatre are performing a noble task in reinterpreting his Duchess of Malfi for the modern audience, much of his upstart spirit has been lost in a production which conforms to almost every fault found in modern productions of verse drama... 

I, Malvolio

I, Malvolio

‘I am not mad’ trills a terrific Tim Crouch, commencing a thoroughly engaging hour of intelligently devised and wonderfully executed theatre. I, Malvolio is written as a narrative recollection of the course of Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night told from the perspective of the puritanical steward... 

Antony and Cleopatra

Antony and Cleopatra

EGTG are not your average fringe company. The graduate theatre group drawn from the local populus, combined with the quaint habits of the Quaker Meeting House staff, meant that from the off this production had a ‘village hall’ vibe which it struggled to escape over the hour-and-twenty... 

Penny Dreadful's Etherdome

Penny Dreadful's Etherdome

The Assembly’s Bosco space is a strange one - one part church, one part yurt - it hints at tent revivalism with a Romany aesthetic. The wooden benches and ethereal removal from the buzz of George Square made for an interesting hour of theatre which never quite capitalised on the potential for real imagination offered by the unique theatre space... 

Nobody's Home: A Modern Odyssey

Nobody's Home: A Modern Odyssey

It is the mark of truly great theatre when the audience leave the auditorium and cannot stop talking about the play. I have spent the entire day with my friends digesting the extent of this production’s triumph, and it continues to excite, shock and emote hours after the show has ended... 

Fear and Misery of the Third Reich

Fear and Misery of the Third Reich

You know you’re onto a loser when (and I counted) five audience members are asleep during your one-hour production. You know you’re onto an even bigger loser when your production is taking place in the mid-afternoon – the one time of day when no-one has a reasonable excuse for being tired... 

Babbling Comedy 2

Babbling Comedy 2

The short audience queue didn’t bode well for Babbling Comedy 2 (when playing for laughs, a C of empty seats is a performer’s worst nightmare), and I found myself preparing to awkwardly force laughter for an hour to spare the performers’ feelings... 

Titus Andronicus

Titus Andronicus

As avid Arden-readers will know, Peter Brook wrote an open letter to Shakespeare in 1957 “giving us full marks for saving your dreadful play”. Poor old Titus received such a bad press during the 20th century that Action to the Word are performing a noble deed repopularising this long-neglected tragedy... 

The Infant

The Infant

Two of my favourite things are Les Enfants Terribles and Theatre of the Absurd. One of my least favourite things is incongruous capitalisation in the middle of sentences but hey ho... 

A Day in November

A Day in November

A Day In November is a beautifully controlled and tenderly delivered reflection on the mind’s descent towards death. We join the story on the final day of an aged puppet’s life; following our protagonist (the Old Man) as he embarks on the adventure of relearning the meaning of things... 

Belt Up's The Boy James

Belt Up's The Boy James

For all the excellent performances and wonderfully controlled aesthetic, this production amounts to nothing more than average; because it's Belt Up, that's disappointing. The Boy James returns for its second run at the Fringe this year, marking perhaps the drying up of the seemingly perpetual ideas-fountain that is Belt Up Theatre... 

101

101

I have had a dream, past the wit of man to say what dream it was, but it happened at 11am in the dark recesses of C's soco building. In that most saturated of fringe markets (pop-Shakespeare) the immersive method of presenting theatre is too often shunned, with companies seemingly erring at the perceived barrier offered by Jacobethan English (yes I did), favouring instead another Grimm fairytale, a devised piece narrated by Peter Pan's disenfranchised shadow, or Alice in Wonderland told from the perspective of the 'eatme' pill...