Passing Places

Passing Places

A road movie, according to Wikipedia, is “a film genre in which the main characters leave home on a road trip,” during which “the hero changes, grows or improves over the course of the story”... 

Three Sisters

Three Sisters

“It’s sweat on your brow that gives life meaning,” says one of the supporting characters in Chekhov’s Three Sisters, and it’s fair to say that, on occasions, there’s a distracting sense of effort being made by some cast members, which is not always comfortable for the audience... 

Rita, Sue and Bob Too

Rita, Sue and Bob Too

It’s 36 years since Andrea Dunbar’s breakthrough play announced the all-too-brief flowering of a new writing talent – “a genius straight from the slums,” as the Mail on Sunday snobbishly described her... 

Travels With My Aunt

Travels With My Aunt

This is a homecoming, of sorts; the revival of a play, first performed at Glasgow's Citizens Theatre back in 1989, which subsequently enjoyed successful productions in the West End and off-Broadway... 

Hay Fever

Hay Fever

Dominic Hill, artistic director of Glasgow’s Citizens Theatre, apparently doesn’t like to constrain any theatrical experience with the blunt instrument of a rising or falling curtain; he clearly prefers both audience and cast to enter the theatre space more or less simultaneously—with things apparently starting only once everyone has turned up... 

Hansel and Gretel

Hansel and Gretel

Scottish writer Stuart Paterson now has a back catalogue of sufficient scale to warrant a revival or two; his adaptation of Roald Dahl’s George’s Marvellous Medicine is currently doing good business at Dundee Rep while, here, Citizens Theatre artistic director Dominic Hill gives fresh life to Paterson’s stage adaptation of the old German fairytale, first performed at Edinburgh’s Royal Lyceum in 1998... 

The Rivals

The Rivals

First performed in 1775, Sheridan’s The Rivals remains surprisingly relevant, not least thanks to its inter-generational conflict. Director Dominic Hill’s tonal approach is most clearly seen in Lydia Languish; she may be dressed up in the finery of 18th century high society, but she acts like a 21st century 17-year-old, full of exaggerated “O-M-G!” posturing and a total belief in her own entitlement... 

This Restless House

This Restless House

Theatrical serendipity currently means that, after some masculine brutality set during the latter stages of the ancient siege of Troy (in the Royal Lyceum’s new adaptation of Homer’s Iliad), a determined audience member need travel just an hour or so west to the Citizens Theatre to find out what happened next to at least some of the victors when they returned home... 

Richard Herring: Happy Now?

Richard Herring: Happy Now?

His 20’s were a fist of fun, his 30’s spent deciphering the intricacies of Big Cook and Little Cook’s business partnership, and then, oh fuck!, he was 40. Now, closing in on 50, he is settling down... 

Blackbird

Blackbird

The Citizens' Theatre's new production of David Harrower's Olivier Award Winning 2005 play Blackbird is an engaging and thought-provoking piece of theatre. It opens with a young woman, Una, confronting a middle aged man, Ray, in the staff recreation area of his place of work... 

Endgame

Endgame

“Finished, it’s finished, nearly finished, it must be nearly finished.” Not, the words you generally expect to hear at the start of a play, but arguably the first proof of the dark, gallows humour which Samuel Beckett’s “a play in one act” provides – although it’s fair to say that on the occasion Chris Gascoyne, as the put-upon servant Clov, has already engendered quite a few laughs before he first speaks, thanks to his unbalanced, heavy-footed lumbering across the stage, and his gratuitously repetitive use of a stepladder to reach and pull back the curtains from the small windows above the action... 

Rapunzel

Rapunzel

Like most of Scotland’s producing theatres, the Citizens Theatre does not, as a matter of principle, “do” panto. Yet magic acorns, audience participation and a plot-significant singalong are still on the menu this Festive season thanks to this impressive and at-times genuinely unnerving presentation of the story of Rapunzel by playwright Annie Siddons, directed by Lu Kemp... 

Lot and his God

Lot and his God

“I must learn to keep my mouth shut when there’s an angel in the room.” So says Lot in Howard Barker’s sexually-charged reimagining of the Old Testament tale of the last days of Sodom... 

Into That Darkness

Into That Darkness

Franz Stangl oversaw the deaths of almost a million people during the fourteen months he was Commandant of the Treblinka extermination camp in Nazi-occupied Poland. And there were many more, while he held other positions beforehand... 

Fever Dream

Fever Dream

Douglas Maxwell's new play, Fever Dream: Southside, is set round the corner from the Citz in nearby Govanhill. During a distressingly hot summer, a local woman organises a rally to inject some community spirit into her neighbourhood, while her husband has a minor breakdown and the act she’s booked to perform has a spiritual breakdown of a more eccentric nature... 

Rum and Vodka

Rum and Vodka

Rum and Vodka, the 1992 debut play by Olivier Award-winning playwright Conor McPherson, is a simple and effective one man show. A young man, sitting on a plain wooden chair, recounts the mad drunken rampage on which he has spent the last three days, destroying most of the things he cares about, and causing a lot of collateral damage in the process... 

Filter's Macbeth

Filter's Macbeth

The “Scottish Play” is among Shakespeare’s shortest, but for critically acclaimed theatre company Filter to edit it down to barely more than 90 minutes, without missing any significant narrative points, is certainly impressive... 

Slope

Slope

There’s a moment in Pamela Carter’s play Slope when the 19th century French poet Paul Verlaine, ensconced in a seedy London flat with his young lover Arthur Rimbaud, fears that they’re being watched... 

Hamlet

Hamlet

Director Dominic Hill's new production of Shakespeare’s most popular play takes the radical step of giving us a Hamlet who is essentially the villain. While still troubled by his father's death, this Hamlet’s emotional turmoil and grief are toned down while his callousness about the harm he causes is emphasised... 

1984

1984

When a work of fiction becomes so iconic a cultural “classic” that it’s known and understood by people who have never read it, it’s unsurprising that a few inaccuracies creep in... 

The Libertine

The Libertine

“You will not like me,” insists John Wilmot, second Earl of Rochester, at the start of The Libertine; not so much presented an unreliable narrator, more the self-created bad boy of Restoration England, determined to be the centre of attention at all times and horrified when one of his companions in wit and hedonism, the playwright “Gentle” George Etherege, fictionalises him in his own play, The Man of Mode, and dares to make the self-declared rake and libertine “endearing”... 

The Beautiful Cosmos of Ivor Cutler

The Beautiful Cosmos of Ivor Cutler

When the Glasgow-born poet, playwright, song-writer, musician, cartoonist, humorist and story-writer Ivor Cutler died in March 2006, the nation’s obituarists remembered an “unassuming master of offbeat humour”, and “one of the great British eccentrics”, the “unlikeliest of cult heroes” whose child-like “wonder at the world” attracted generations of admirers from Bertrand Russell and Paul McCartney to the DJ John Peel and discoverer of Oasis, Alan McGee... 

Twelfth Night

Twelfth Night

Twelfth night is a time of chaos, mess and topsy-turvy. So Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night should be similarly carnivalesque, a play particularly unsuited for the historically anomalous approach of on-script, stony faced adaptation...