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Apologia tickets
Staging the Unstageable with Kill The Beast’s Zoe Roberts & Natasha Hodgson

Staging the Unstageable with Kill The Beast’s Zoe Roberts & Natasha Hodgson

Macabre comedy company Kill The Beast (Peter Brook and Manchester Theatre Award winners) return to the Fringe with their 70s werewolf spectacular He Had Hairy Hands and a new 80s futuristic throwback, Don’t Wake the Damp. Broadway Baby’s James T Harding met writer-performers Zoe Roberts and Natasha Hodgson to learn about the magic of Warwick, the role of democracy in script development, and creating compelling women’s roles in horror. Continue Reading

Fossils’ Nel Crouch: “Theatre is alive and well at the Fringe!”

Fossils’ Nel Crouch: “Theatre is alive and well at the Fringe!”

Award-winning theatre company Bucket Club are melding together playful theatre with a live techno score for Fossils, a sceptical quest for the Loch Ness Monster at the Pleasance Dome. Alexander Gillespie sat down with writer/director Nel Crouch to find out about how the show was made, and what’s next for Fossils after the Fringe. Continue Reading

Shakespeare Syndrome\'s Catriona Scott on Macbeth\'s Rorschach Test

Shakespeare Syndrome's Catriona Scott on Macbeth's Rorschach Test

How do you tell a story using Shakespeare’s characters and make it original? How do you tell a story about Shakespeare himself for that matter? For Catriona Scott, playwright of Shakespeare Syndrome, the answer was simple: mix together a handful of the bard’s most famous characters (and the bard himself), put them in therapy, give them all a good shake, and serve with a nice red wine for comedy. Al Gillespie chatted with the playwright about all things Shakespearean at the Fringe. Continue Reading

Us/Them\'s Carly Wijs & Gytha Parmentier are Talking Terrorism to Children at Summerhall

Us/Them's Carly Wijs & Gytha Parmentier are Talking Terrorism to Children at Summerhall

Us/Them, a family dance show about terrorism, has been one of the surprise hits of this year’s Edinburgh Fringe. Children’s Correspondent Tom Moyser met its writer and director Carly Wijs, with performers Gytha Parmentier and Roman Van Houtven, to get the inside story of its development; and to discuss the ways that theatre can engage children with challenging and controversial subjects. Continue Reading

Two Tired for Shakespeare? Try the Handlebards Energetic Cycling Performances

Two Tired for Shakespeare? Try the Handlebards Energetic Cycling Performances

It’s been 400 years since William Shakespeare shuffled off to wherever he is now, and the Fringe guide is filled with his plays—possibly even more productions than usual, which would be saying something. The Handlebards, however, are perhaps the only company to get to the festival entirely under their own power. That is, entirely by bicycle. The troupes have cycled across the UK, from London to Edinburgh (1500 miles). They carry all their sets and costumes with them, and stop along the way to perform at various venues, most of them outdoors.Although they’re sadly no longer running their Secret Shakespeare shows, in which the audience cycles along with them to an undisclosed performance location, this year they’ve brought two troupes with two shows apiece. The all-male bards, (Stanton Plummer-Cambridge, Liam Mansfield, Paul Hilliar, and Matt Maltby), are performing Much Ado About Nothing and Richard III, while the all-female troupe will be performing The Taming of the Shrew and Romeo and Juliet. All the productions are performed outdoors in Edinburgh’s Royal Botanic Gardens, whatever the weather.The Handlebards are more than just very physically active actors—their inventive shows offer a highly comic and clever treatment of Shakespeare, one that allows for ad-libbing, songs, audience participation, and general silliness. Broadway Baby’s Lauren Moreau visited the male bards in the Gardens before one of their shows and chatted with them about their tour experiences so far. Continue Reading

Student New Writing at the Fringe: Oxford, Warwick and St Andrews Students Compare Notes

Student New Writing at the Fringe: Oxford, Warwick and St Andrews Students Compare Notes

The Fringe is the single most exciting date in the student-theatre calendar. Although accommodation and production costs are rising, it still represents one of the best chances young playwrights, directors and actors have of getting that much-feted big break – not to mention the all-important opportunity to meet and make friends with hundreds of theatrically minded students from all over the UK. Broadway Baby’s Alexander Gillespie speaks to representatives of three student productions from different Universities to talk about the differences between their universities’ scenes, trends and problems with student writing in general, and the call of the Fringe that keeps them coming back for more. Meet Joanna Bowman, director of Delay Detach at Greenside, coming from St Andrews University; Sam George, director of The Murderer at Zoo Southside, from Warwick; and Flo Read, playwright of Cold/Warm at Pleasance Courtyard, from Oxford. Continue Reading

Stop The Train\'s Rick Guard on the Magic of New Musicals at the Fringe

Stop The Train's Rick Guard on the Magic of New Musicals at the Fringe

Stop The Train is a new musical from Rick Guard and Phil Rice following the story of commuters plunged into a dangerous situation - and forced to talk to each other. Broadway Baby’s Chris Quilietti spoke to co-composer Rick Guard about the workshopping process and why Edinburgh is such a brilliant place to bring a new musical. Continue Reading

Steps\' Lee Latchford-Evans on Learning Accents for Eurobeat

Steps' Lee Latchford-Evans on Learning Accents for Eurobeat

Tired of having to wait a full year to get that Eurovision vibe? Then you’ll love Eurobeat, a comedy musical where European countries - including Vatican City - compete for your audience votes. Chris Quilietti caught up with Lee Latchford-Evans (from Steps) who plays host Nikolai Nikovsky. Continue Reading

The Nuclear Family Team on Creating Interactive Theatre Formats

The Nuclear Family Team on Creating Interactive Theatre Formats

Do you work well under pressure? How about life-or-death pressure? Nuclear Family gives you the chance to find out by inviting the audience to mount an enquiry about a pair of sibling security guards at a nuclear power plant. Chris Quilietti caught up with this interactive theatre show’s cast and creative team Eva O’Connor, Adam Devro and Jonathan Carr. Continue Reading

Hyprov: Improv Under Hypnosis’s Asad Mecci on the Science behind the Show

Hyprov: Improv Under Hypnosis’s Asad Mecci on the Science behind the Show

You don’t know this, but somewhere inside you is a comedy genius just waiting to be unleashed - all you need is a hypnotist to help you let it out. Asad Mecci’s new show Hyprov: Improv Under Hypnosis turns audience volunteers into improv stars alongside veterans Colin Mochrie and Mike McShane. Chris Quilietti caught up with Asad to find out about the links between hypnotic disassociation and comedy gold. Continue Reading

Sun, Chen-Chieh on Inspiring Children to Becoming Puppeteers

Sun, Chen-Chieh on Inspiring Children to Becoming Puppeteers

The Adventure of Puppets charts the voyage of two explorers as they venture into the unknown. After fifteen years of touring it comes to the Edinburgh Fringe as part of the Taiwan Season. Children’s Correspondent Tom Moyser spoke to the show’s director and original creator Sun, Chen-Chieh (AKA Jack Sun) about the magic of children’s laughter. Continue Reading

Andrew Roberts & Josh Mathieson are Dealing with Death in Children\'s Theatre

Andrew Roberts & Josh Mathieson are Dealing with Death in Children's Theatre

The Many Doors of Frank Feelbad is a brave and engaging work about how children and families process and communicate grief. Children’s Correspondent Tom Moyser met writer/actor Andrew Roberts and his co-star Josh Mathieson to discover how children’s theatre can be used to start conversations that some school curriculums are shying away from. Continue Reading

A Capella Radio Special: All The Kings Men & The Magnets

A Capella Radio Special: All The Kings Men & The Magnets

A capella is something of a phenomenon at the Edinburgh Fringe. Some groups start at colleges and universities and become fringe staples, while others have been performing for 30 years or more. Adrian Bradley speaks to members of The Magnets and All The Kings Men: with the rise of Glee and Pitch Perfect, a capella is cool - but is it cut throat? Continue Reading

How to Win Against History\'s Seiriol Davies on Making a Musical

How to Win Against History's Seiriol Davies on Making a Musical

How to Win Against History is a new musical about Henry Cyril Paget, an eccentric, cross-dressing marquis who was written out of history by his family. James T Harding met Seiriol Davies (Mess, Underbling & Vow) to learn more about the marquis behind the musical, the show’s development into what we see today, and how to repel Roman troops using only the power of dance. Continue Reading

​Linda McLean on her Adaptation of The View From Castle Rock

​Linda McLean on her Adaptation of The View From Castle Rock

Alice Munro’s short-story collection The View from Castle Rock fictionalises the real-life history of her ancestors’ economic migration from Scotland to Canada. Stellar Quines has taken up residence St Mark’s Church for a half-Fringe half-Edinburgh International Book Festival production, the first time any of the Nobel Prize winner’s work has been dramatised in Scotland. Features Editor James T Harding spoke to playwright Linda McLean to learn more about her unusual adaptation style. Continue Reading

​Dracula Director Danny Wainwright on Mixing Politics with Comedy

​Dracula Director Danny Wainwright on Mixing Politics with Comedy

There couldn’t be a more poignant time to retell the story of Dracula with a 21st-century twang. With both the Brexit referendum and Donald Trump’s presidential campaign being at the forefront of politics since the turn of the new year, it is somewhat ironic that a 1897 novel about a Transylvanian vampire could make such a poignant message on issues of immigration. In the Pleasance Courtyard Let Them Call It Mischief are retelling this tale of a Romanian immigrant with comic flare. Director and co-writer Danny Wainwright tells Sophia Charalambous about what drew him to inject the funny into such a politically-charged, Gothic horror story. Continue Reading

​Paines Plough’s James Grieve & Remy Beasley on the Magic of Theatre for Teens

​Paines Plough’s James Grieve & Remy Beasley on the Magic of Theatre for Teens

I Got Superpowers for my Birthday by Katie Douglas is an action-packed fantasy adventure about the pains of growing up and learning you can shoot fire from your fingertips. Broadway Baby Children’s Correspondent Tom Moyser met actor Remy Beasley and Paines Plough’s artistic director James Grieve to discuss the power and responsibility of making theatre for teenagers. Continue Reading

The Ruby in the Smoke Team on Working with Philip Pullman

The Ruby in the Smoke Team on Working with Philip Pullman

Philip Pullman’s The Ruby in the Smoke sees the author’s Victorian mystery novel come to the stage for the first time. Broadway Baby Children’s Correspondent Tom Moyser met writer-director Madeleine Perham, producer Madeleine Golding and lead actor Rebecca Lenihan to discuss Pullman, skirt-hoiking and why it is so important to have the right hats. Continue Reading

​Milk Playwright Ross Dunsmore on Bravery in New Writing

​Milk Playwright Ross Dunsmore on Bravery in New Writing

What do we need to nourish ourselves? Is love enough? Can we definitively say that Nandos are the kings of fast food? Such questions and more are explored in the invigorating new play Milk, on at the Traverse Theatre this festival. Alexander Gillespie sat down with first-time playwright Ross Dunsmore to learn more about his journey from open submissions to the Traverse One stage. Continue Reading

Jonny Labey & Quentin Beroud on Rediscovering Rupert Brooke for Verge of Strife

Jonny Labey & Quentin Beroud on Rediscovering Rupert Brooke for Verge of Strife

Poet Rupert Brooke is known for the patriotic poetry he wrote as World War One got under way, but most know little about the trail of broken hearts he left through Edwardian counter-culture beforehand. A new play Verge of Strife by Nick Baldock aims to change all that by bringing Brooke’s life and work back into prominence. Star Jonny Labey (EastEnders) and director Quentin Beroud (Richard II, House of Parliament) join Features Editor James T Harding to talk about getting into Brooke’s usually cruel character, his bisexuality, and the way he has and hasn’t been remembered. Continue Reading

Julia Sutherland on Prison Romance, Staging Radio, and her show Jailmates

Julia Sutherland on Prison Romance, Staging Radio, and her show Jailmates

Based on it’s performers’ real-life stand-up material, Jailmates is a love story about an unlikely couple who meet on a pen-pal website jailmates.com. The Radio Scotland comedy drama is previewing at the Fringe before being recorded later this year. Features Editor James T Harding met co-writer and performer Julia Sutherland to talk about the shows unusual writing process. Continue Reading

Lion King tickets