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Danyah Miller’s Inspection of Perfection

Danyah Miller’s Inspection of Perfection

As a course leader at The International School of Storytelling, Danyah Miller can certainly spin a good yarn. Here at the Fringe, she is turning her talents to the baffling question of why we strive so desperately for perfection, often at high costs. Her one-woman show Perfectly Imperfect Women is a fabulous and diverse performance that cleverly weaves fairytales and audience involvement into fascinating journey through Danyah’s family history. Broadway Baby’s Carla van der Sluijs met Danyah to talk about the show, the art of audience inclusion, and the inclusivity of feminism. Continue Reading

Atlantic: Two New Musicals from RCS set Either Side of the Pond

Atlantic: Two New Musicals from RCS set Either Side of the Pond

The Royal Conservatoire of Scotland and The American Music Theatre Project at Northwestern University have teamed up to bring two brand-new musicals to the Fringe. Atlantic: A Scottish Story is a haunting show set on a remote Scottish island that asks the question: what if we didn’t go on the adventure? It follows Eve, a girl who didn’t follow her heart and stays where she thinks she belongs. The second show is Atlantic: America and the Great War. During WWI, a woman searches for her sister, reported missing after serving on the front line. Leaving home for the first time, she uncovers her family’s past and a secret love. Chris speaks to various people from the shows to find out more. Continue Reading

What Would Kanye Do?’s Clare Marcie on Connecting with Kanye West

What Would Kanye Do?’s Clare Marcie on Connecting with Kanye West

Broadway Baby’s Gordon Douglas is joined by Scotland-based theatre-maker Clare Marcie to talk about her new show What Would Kanye Do?, part of the programme at theSpace @ Jury’s Inn.Clare Marcie grew up in Aotearoa, New Zealand, and moved to the UK to study at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland in Glasgow. Since then, she has been a prominent and supportive member of the local scene. She is most well known for her productions The Flinching, Outside Eyes, and the series of podcasts Bill & Me, a self-described ‘smorgasbord of Shakespeare geekdom’ that adventures into her nuanced relationship with the powerful historical figure.Continuing on this research into cultures of fandom, What Would Kanye Do? introduces us to the character of Marcy, a teenage girl from Christchurch, New Zealand, whose frustration and anxiety about her life, procures language through her obsession with Kanye West.In a domestic setting perched on a dinner table, Gordon and Marcie talk through: how feelings of belonging can emerge through a globalised popular culture; the similarities between the fictional character Marcy, and the cultural character of New Zealand; and the complex legacies of colonial empire. Continue Reading

The Royal Court’s Elyse Dodgson on the Joy of Directors who Support Writers

The Royal Court’s Elyse Dodgson on the Joy of Directors who Support Writers

As part of the Edinburgh International Festival the Royal Court was invited to present a series of rehearsed readings by playwrights from Chile, China, Cuba, Lebanon, Palestine and Ukraine under the theme of New and Now. Broadway Baby’s Theatre Editor, Liam Rees, caught up with director and curator Elyse Dodgson to discuss the Royal Court’s international work, the challenges of producing said work, and the changing face of British theatre. Continue Reading

Taggart Creator Glenn Chandler\'s Gay Boarding-school Play

Taggart Creator Glenn Chandler's Gay Boarding-school Play

Glenn Chandler, creator of the legendary Taggart, has become known at the Fringe for his plays exploring different facets of gay life. This year, Lord Dismiss Us, from the 1967 novel by Michael Campbell, is amusing audiences at theSpace @ Surgeons Hall. In conversation with Broadway Baby’s James T. Harding, Glenn talks about his process of adaptation, overcoming suicidal feelings during his schooldays in Edinburgh, and the London gay scene of the 1970s. Continue Reading

Virtual Reality Comes to the Fringe at Assembly\'s FuturePlay Festival

Virtual Reality Comes to the Fringe at Assembly's FuturePlay Festival

Could virtual reality and interactive media become a staple of the Fringe programme? Housed in Assembly Rooms on George Street, FuturePlay is an artist-led technology festival that builds on last year's EDEF (Edinburgh Digital Entertainment Festival) with a greater focus on variety, fun, and integration into the city's buzzing event schedule. Having sampled some of the games, simulations, and offerings from Pixar and Cirque du Soleil, Henry St Leger sat down with the FuturePlay producer, Josh McNorton, to talk art, technology, and the future of Edinburgh Fringe. Continue Reading

#EdFringe17: Radhika Aggarwal in an Arrangement of Shoes

#EdFringe17: Radhika Aggarwal in an Arrangement of Shoes

The On the Mic podcast takes a brief break from stand-up comedy to talk to actor, Radhika Aggarwal, who stars in Abhishek Majumdar’s play, ‘An Arrangement of Shoes’, directed by Maya Foa. Radhika talks about the play, about being an actor and about her band, Extradition Order. Continue Reading

​Drolls: The Illegal Comedies Time Forgot

​Drolls: The Illegal Comedies Time Forgot

At the largest arts festival in the world, it's easy to forget that theatre wasn't always welcome in Britain. When the Puritans made theatre illegal, the scene was driven underground. This working man's theatre of the Seventeenth Century has been largely unknown, but now The Owle Schreame Theatre Company aims to revive and revitalise the bawdy 17th-century drolls for a new audience. Broadway Baby’s James T Harding interviewed actor and artistic director Brice Stratford to learn more about the historical context of the drolls, the process of turning them into a performance, and the best type of milk to pour over an actor’s face. Continue Reading

​Brexit and Nazi Art: Interview with Ten Storey Love Song’s Paul Smith

​Brexit and Nazi Art: Interview with Ten Storey Love Song’s Paul Smith

Bobby Winner Ten Storey Love Song (adapted by Luke Barnes from the Richard Milward novel) is a play cum techno gig about five wretched tower-block inhabitants who deserve better from life. Broadway Baby’s Oliver Simmonds asks Paul Smith, artistic director of Hull-based Middle Child theatre about reacting to Brexit, unlikable characters, and (sort-of) being called a Nazi. Continue Reading

Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally’s Ianthe Demos on Sentient Mobile Phones

Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally’s Ianthe Demos on Sentient Mobile Phones

If you’ve a maths brain, you might recognise the term ‘Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally’ as a mnemonic for the order of operations in arithmetic. It’s also the title of a new play from the US following the story of a maths teacher’s affair with one of her students - told from the point of view of a mobile phone. Chris Quilietti caught up with One Year Lease Theater Company’s artistic director, Ianthe Demos. Continue Reading

Agent of Influence’s Sarah Sigal on the Unusual Staying Power of Pamela More

Agent of Influence’s Sarah Sigal on the Unusual Staying Power of Pamela More

Agent of Influence: The Secret Life of Pamela More is the story of a high-society fashion journalist recruited by MI5 to facilitate the abdication of King Edward VIII. Broadway Baby’s James T Harding met playwright Sarah Sigal to learn more about holding seances with fictional characters, the nature of theatrical collaboration, and her family’s multigenerational conspiracy theory. Continue Reading

Staging the Unstageable with Kill The Beast’s Zoe Roberts & Natasha Hodgson

Staging the Unstageable with Kill The Beast’s Zoe Roberts & Natasha Hodgson

Macabre comedy company Kill The Beast (Peter Brook and Manchester Theatre Award winners) return to the Fringe with their 70s werewolf spectacular He Had Hairy Hands and a new 80s futuristic throwback, Don’t Wake the Damp. Broadway Baby’s James T Harding met writer-performers Zoe Roberts and Natasha Hodgson to learn about the magic of Warwick, the role of democracy in script development, and creating compelling women’s roles in horror. Continue Reading

Fossils’ Nel Crouch: “Theatre is alive and well at the Fringe!”

Fossils’ Nel Crouch: “Theatre is alive and well at the Fringe!”

Award-winning theatre company Bucket Club are melding together playful theatre with a live techno score for Fossils, a sceptical quest for the Loch Ness Monster at the Pleasance Dome. Alexander Gillespie sat down with writer/director Nel Crouch to find out about how the show was made, and what’s next for Fossils after the Fringe. Continue Reading

Shakespeare Syndrome\'s Catriona Scott on Macbeth\'s Rorschach Test

Shakespeare Syndrome's Catriona Scott on Macbeth's Rorschach Test

How do you tell a story using Shakespeare’s characters and make it original? How do you tell a story about Shakespeare himself for that matter? For Catriona Scott, playwright of Shakespeare Syndrome, the answer was simple: mix together a handful of the bard’s most famous characters (and the bard himself), put them in therapy, give them all a good shake, and serve with a nice red wine for comedy. Al Gillespie chatted with the playwright about all things Shakespearean at the Fringe. Continue Reading

Us/Them\'s Carly Wijs & Gytha Parmentier are Talking Terrorism to Children at Summerhall

Us/Them's Carly Wijs & Gytha Parmentier are Talking Terrorism to Children at Summerhall

Us/Them, a family dance show about terrorism, has been one of the surprise hits of this year’s Edinburgh Fringe. Children’s Correspondent Tom Moyser met its writer and director Carly Wijs, with performers Gytha Parmentier and Roman Van Houtven, to get the inside story of its development; and to discuss the ways that theatre can engage children with challenging and controversial subjects. Continue Reading

Two Tired for Shakespeare? Try the Handlebards Energetic Cycling Performances

Two Tired for Shakespeare? Try the Handlebards Energetic Cycling Performances

It’s been 400 years since William Shakespeare shuffled off to wherever he is now, and the Fringe guide is filled with his plays—possibly even more productions than usual, which would be saying something. The Handlebards, however, are perhaps the only company to get to the festival entirely under their own power. That is, entirely by bicycle. The troupes have cycled across the UK, from London to Edinburgh (1500 miles). They carry all their sets and costumes with them, and stop along the way to perform at various venues, most of them outdoors.Although they’re sadly no longer running their Secret Shakespeare shows, in which the audience cycles along with them to an undisclosed performance location, this year they’ve brought two troupes with two shows apiece. The all-male bards, (Stanton Plummer-Cambridge, Liam Mansfield, Paul Hilliar, and Matt Maltby), are performing Much Ado About Nothing and Richard III, while the all-female troupe will be performing The Taming of the Shrew and Romeo and Juliet. All the productions are performed outdoors in Edinburgh’s Royal Botanic Gardens, whatever the weather.The Handlebards are more than just very physically active actors—their inventive shows offer a highly comic and clever treatment of Shakespeare, one that allows for ad-libbing, songs, audience participation, and general silliness. Broadway Baby’s Lauren Moreau visited the male bards in the Gardens before one of their shows and chatted with them about their tour experiences so far. Continue Reading

Student New Writing at the Fringe: Oxford, Warwick and St Andrews Students Compare Notes

Student New Writing at the Fringe: Oxford, Warwick and St Andrews Students Compare Notes

The Fringe is the single most exciting date in the student-theatre calendar. Although accommodation and production costs are rising, it still represents one of the best chances young playwrights, directors and actors have of getting that much-feted big break – not to mention the all-important opportunity to meet and make friends with hundreds of theatrically minded students from all over the UK. Broadway Baby’s Alexander Gillespie speaks to representatives of three student productions from different Universities to talk about the differences between their universities’ scenes, trends and problems with student writing in general, and the call of the Fringe that keeps them coming back for more. Meet Joanna Bowman, director of Delay Detach at Greenside, coming from St Andrews University; Sam George, director of The Murderer at Zoo Southside, from Warwick; and Flo Read, playwright of Cold/Warm at Pleasance Courtyard, from Oxford. Continue Reading

Stop The Train\'s Rick Guard on the Magic of New Musicals at the Fringe

Stop The Train's Rick Guard on the Magic of New Musicals at the Fringe

Stop The Train is a new musical from Rick Guard and Phil Rice following the story of commuters plunged into a dangerous situation - and forced to talk to each other. Broadway Baby’s Chris Quilietti spoke to co-composer Rick Guard about the workshopping process and why Edinburgh is such a brilliant place to bring a new musical. Continue Reading

Steps\' Lee Latchford-Evans on Learning Accents for Eurobeat

Steps' Lee Latchford-Evans on Learning Accents for Eurobeat

Tired of having to wait a full year to get that Eurovision vibe? Then you’ll love Eurobeat, a comedy musical where European countries - including Vatican City - compete for your audience votes. Chris Quilietti caught up with Lee Latchford-Evans (from Steps) who plays host Nikolai Nikovsky. Continue Reading

The Nuclear Family Team on Creating Interactive Theatre Formats

The Nuclear Family Team on Creating Interactive Theatre Formats

Do you work well under pressure? How about life-or-death pressure? Nuclear Family gives you the chance to find out by inviting the audience to mount an enquiry about a pair of sibling security guards at a nuclear power plant. Chris Quilietti caught up with this interactive theatre show’s cast and creative team Eva O’Connor, Adam Devro and Jonathan Carr. Continue Reading

Hyprov: Improv Under Hypnosis’s Asad Mecci on the Science behind the Show

Hyprov: Improv Under Hypnosis’s Asad Mecci on the Science behind the Show

You don’t know this, but somewhere inside you is a comedy genius just waiting to be unleashed - all you need is a hypnotist to help you let it out. Asad Mecci’s new show Hyprov: Improv Under Hypnosis turns audience volunteers into improv stars alongside veterans Colin Mochrie and Mike McShane. Chris Quilietti caught up with Asad to find out about the links between hypnotic disassociation and comedy gold. Continue Reading