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Fiona McNamara & Ralph Upton on their Approach to Audience Interaction

Fiona McNamara & Ralph Upton on their Approach to Audience Interaction

Binge Culture are a performance-art group of five that originated in Wellington, New Zealand. They’re always thinking about how to get the audience involved in their work and playing with forms outside of traditional theatre. The group have three highly contrasting shows to this year’s Fringe – Whales, Break Up: We Need to Talk and Ancient Shrines and Half Truths. Sarah Virgo met two of the team, Fiona McNamara and Ralph Upton, to learn a bit more about the inspiration and thinking behind each of them. Continue Reading

‘Edinburgh is kind of like tapas’ – New Diorama Theatre’s David Byrne

‘Edinburgh is kind of like tapas’ – New Diorama Theatre’s David Byrne

Having received rave reviews for The Secret Life of Humans as well as supporting dozens of other theatre companies at the Fringe and beyond, the New Diorama Theatre has made a name for itself as one of the new powerhouses of British theatre. Broadway Baby’s Theatre Editor, Liam Rees, caught up with artistic director David Byrne to discuss the challenges of devising and how theatres can support emerging and established companies. Continue Reading

Bobby Winners All We Ever Wanted Was Everything on Reinventing the Musical

Bobby Winners All We Ever Wanted Was Everything on Reinventing the Musical

Ever since their debut in 2015 with Weekend Rockstars Middle Child Theatre have been rewriting what musical theatre can be with their distinctive gig-theatre genre. Their new show, All We Ever Wanted Was Everything, has been met with rave reviews and a coveted Bobby Award from Broadway Baby. Liam Rees caught up with playwright, Luke Barnes, and composer, James Frewer, to discuss the creative process and the benefits of culture outside of the capital. Continue Reading

100 Ways to Tie a Shoelace on Sensitive Issues in Theatre

100 Ways to Tie a Shoelace on Sensitive Issues in Theatre

Having made their Fringe debut last year with The Life and Times of Lionel, theatre company Forget About The Dog are back with their new show, 100 Ways to Tie a Shoelace. Kat has had an accident and has trouble remembering things. The show presents her journey and relationships with her mind and her family. This group have so far gone from strength to strength using their own style of charming physicality. Actors Leanne Stenson and Joshua Ling spoke to Chris Quilietti. Continue Reading

Queerness and Colonialism in Lilith: The Jungle Girl at the Traverse

Queerness and Colonialism in Lilith: The Jungle Girl at the Traverse

In nineteenth-century Holland, a leading neuroscientist tries to ‘civilise’ a wild girl who was raised by lions in the heart of Borneo. Broadway Baby’s Theatre Editor, Liam Rees, met some of the creators of Sisters Grimm’s latest show, Lilith: The Jungle Girl – Ash Flanders, Candy Bowers and Declan Greene – to talk about queerness, colonialism and the differences between Australian and British audiences. Continue Reading

Charlie Duprè on Meeting Tony Blair, the Man he Now Portrays

Charlie Duprè on Meeting Tony Blair, the Man he Now Portrays

Betrayal, money, power, politics and love. All thing you find in a standard Shakespeare play. And modern politics. Macblair, written by Charlie Duprè, Bard-ifies the rise and fall of Tony Blair with rap, verse and tongue firmly in cheek. Chris Quilietti spoke to Charlie about the piece. Continue Reading

Will Naameh, Steve Hartil and Sean McCann Talk Improv at the Fringe

Will Naameh, Steve Hartil and Sean McCann Talk Improv at the Fringe

Improv is as big as it’s ever been at the Fringe, with well over a hundred shows for you to choose from. Chris Quilietti leads a panel discussion with improvisors from some of the festival’s most popular shows: Will Naameh (Spontaneous Sherlock/Men With Coconuts) Steve Hartil (Murder She Didn’t Write), and Sean McCann (Showstopper! The Improvised Musical/Rhapsodes). Topics include new trends in improv, rehearsing to improvise, the nature of the troupe, and the Edinburgh energy. Continue Reading

‘What I like about Edinburgh audiences is that they’re up for adventure’ – Meow Meow

‘What I like about Edinburgh audiences is that they’re up for adventure’ – Meow Meow

Meow Meow is an international actress, singer, and dancer. She’s performed her works with The London Philharmonic Orchestra, played Titania in A Midsummer Night’s Dream at Shakespeare’s Globe and toured her own work around the world. She returns to the Edinburgh International Festival for the European Premiere of Meow Meow’s Little Mermaid, a playful cabaret reimagining of Hans Christian Andersen’s fairytale. Features Writer Carly Brown spoke with her about the original fairytale, creating her show and why she likes performing in Edinburgh. Continue Reading

Clique’s Milly Thomas Dives in at the Deep End with Two Plays this Fringe

Clique’s Milly Thomas Dives in at the Deep End with Two Plays this Fringe

Writer and actor Milly Thomas is best known in the theatre world for her 2016 play Clickbait and for writing an episode of Clique on BBC Three. This Fringe she is presenting two plays of her own penning: Dust at Underbelly – which she also stars in – and Brutal Cessation at Assembly. James T. Harding met her to talk about the process behind the two plays, her duty of care to the audience, and how best to support emerging, diverse writers. Continue Reading

Pollyanna’s Pollyfilla Talks Queer Cabaret and Political Anxiety

Pollyanna’s Pollyfilla Talks Queer Cabaret and Political Anxiety

Broadway Baby’s Gordon Douglas met Adam Castle, the host of Pollyanna to talk about the outrageous, late-night queer cabaret that’s on everybody’s minds.As well as directing and hosting Pollyanna, Castle is the director of Edinburgh Artists’ Moving Image Festival, an annual festival for the celebration of moving image. In recognition of their efforts in both of these, Castle won The Creative Edinburgh Leadership Award in 2016.Having experienced Pollyanna last year, Gordon was eager to return to the cabaret once again. The morning after the show, Gordon and Adam discuss: the draw for performers to share their work in a social, cabaret format; how to provide space and opportunity for an audience to communally exercise their political anxieties; and the origins of Pollyanna’s host Pollyfilla. Continue Reading

Danyah Miller’s Inspection of Perfection

Danyah Miller’s Inspection of Perfection

As a course leader at The International School of Storytelling, Danyah Miller can certainly spin a good yarn. Here at the Fringe, she is turning her talents to the baffling question of why we strive so desperately for perfection, often at high costs. Her one-woman show Perfectly Imperfect Women is a fabulous and diverse performance that cleverly weaves fairytales and audience involvement into fascinating journey through Danyah’s family history. Broadway Baby’s Carla van der Sluijs met Danyah to talk about the show, the art of audience inclusion, and the inclusivity of feminism. Continue Reading

Atlantic: Two New Musicals from RCS set Either Side of the Pond

Atlantic: Two New Musicals from RCS set Either Side of the Pond

The Royal Conservatoire of Scotland and The American Music Theatre Project at Northwestern University have teamed up to bring two brand-new musicals to the Fringe. Atlantic: A Scottish Story is a haunting show set on a remote Scottish island that asks the question: what if we didn’t go on the adventure? It follows Eve, a girl who didn’t follow her heart and stays where she thinks she belongs. The second show is Atlantic: America and the Great War. During WWI, a woman searches for her sister, reported missing after serving on the front line. Leaving home for the first time, she uncovers her family’s past and a secret love. Chris speaks to various people from the shows to find out more. Continue Reading

What Would Kanye Do?’s Clare Marcie on Connecting with Kanye West

What Would Kanye Do?’s Clare Marcie on Connecting with Kanye West

Broadway Baby’s Gordon Douglas is joined by Scotland-based theatre-maker Clare Marcie to talk about her new show What Would Kanye Do?, part of the programme at theSpace @ Jury’s Inn.Clare Marcie grew up in Aotearoa, New Zealand, and moved to the UK to study at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland in Glasgow. Since then, she has been a prominent and supportive member of the local scene. She is most well known for her productions The Flinching, Outside Eyes, and the series of podcasts Bill & Me, a self-described ‘smorgasbord of Shakespeare geekdom’ that adventures into her nuanced relationship with the powerful historical figure.Continuing on this research into cultures of fandom, What Would Kanye Do? introduces us to the character of Marcy, a teenage girl from Christchurch, New Zealand, whose frustration and anxiety about her life, procures language through her obsession with Kanye West.In a domestic setting perched on a dinner table, Gordon and Marcie talk through: how feelings of belonging can emerge through a globalised popular culture; the similarities between the fictional character Marcy, and the cultural character of New Zealand; and the complex legacies of colonial empire. Continue Reading

The Royal Court’s Elyse Dodgson on the Joy of Directors who Support Writers

The Royal Court’s Elyse Dodgson on the Joy of Directors who Support Writers

As part of the Edinburgh International Festival the Royal Court was invited to present a series of rehearsed readings by playwrights from Chile, China, Cuba, Lebanon, Palestine and Ukraine under the theme of New and Now. Broadway Baby’s Theatre Editor, Liam Rees, caught up with director and curator Elyse Dodgson to discuss the Royal Court’s international work, the challenges of producing said work, and the changing face of British theatre. Continue Reading

Taggart Creator Glenn Chandler\'s Gay Boarding-school Play

Taggart Creator Glenn Chandler's Gay Boarding-school Play

Glenn Chandler, creator of the legendary Taggart, has become known at the Fringe for his plays exploring different facets of gay life. This year, Lord Dismiss Us, from the 1967 novel by Michael Campbell, is amusing audiences at theSpace @ Surgeons Hall. In conversation with Broadway Baby’s James T. Harding, Glenn talks about his process of adaptation, overcoming suicidal feelings during his schooldays in Edinburgh, and the London gay scene of the 1970s. Continue Reading

Virtual Reality Comes to the Fringe at Assembly\'s FuturePlay Festival

Virtual Reality Comes to the Fringe at Assembly's FuturePlay Festival

Could virtual reality and interactive media become a staple of the Fringe programme? Housed in Assembly Rooms on George Street, FuturePlay is an artist-led technology festival that builds on last year's EDEF (Edinburgh Digital Entertainment Festival) with a greater focus on variety, fun, and integration into the city's buzzing event schedule. Having sampled some of the games, simulations, and offerings from Pixar and Cirque du Soleil, Henry St Leger sat down with the FuturePlay producer, Josh McNorton, to talk art, technology, and the future of Edinburgh Fringe. Continue Reading

#EdFringe17: Radhika Aggarwal in an Arrangement of Shoes

#EdFringe17: Radhika Aggarwal in an Arrangement of Shoes

The On the Mic podcast takes a brief break from stand-up comedy to talk to actor, Radhika Aggarwal, who stars in Abhishek Majumdar’s play, ‘An Arrangement of Shoes’, directed by Maya Foa. Radhika talks about the play, about being an actor and about her band, Extradition Order. Continue Reading

​Drolls: The Illegal Comedies Time Forgot

​Drolls: The Illegal Comedies Time Forgot

At the largest arts festival in the world, it's easy to forget that theatre wasn't always welcome in Britain. When the Puritans made theatre illegal, the scene was driven underground. This working man's theatre of the Seventeenth Century has been largely unknown, but now The Owle Schreame Theatre Company aims to revive and revitalise the bawdy 17th-century drolls for a new audience. Broadway Baby’s James T Harding interviewed actor and artistic director Brice Stratford to learn more about the historical context of the drolls, the process of turning them into a performance, and the best type of milk to pour over an actor’s face. Continue Reading

​Brexit and Nazi Art: Interview with Ten Storey Love Song’s Paul Smith

​Brexit and Nazi Art: Interview with Ten Storey Love Song’s Paul Smith

Bobby Winner Ten Storey Love Song (adapted by Luke Barnes from the Richard Milward novel) is a play cum techno gig about five wretched tower-block inhabitants who deserve better from life. Broadway Baby’s Oliver Simmonds asks Paul Smith, artistic director of Hull-based Middle Child theatre about reacting to Brexit, unlikable characters, and (sort-of) being called a Nazi. Continue Reading

Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally’s Ianthe Demos on Sentient Mobile Phones

Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally’s Ianthe Demos on Sentient Mobile Phones

If you’ve a maths brain, you might recognise the term ‘Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally’ as a mnemonic for the order of operations in arithmetic. It’s also the title of a new play from the US following the story of a maths teacher’s affair with one of her students - told from the point of view of a mobile phone. Chris Quilietti caught up with One Year Lease Theater Company’s artistic director, Ianthe Demos. Continue Reading

Agent of Influence’s Sarah Sigal on the Unusual Staying Power of Pamela More

Agent of Influence’s Sarah Sigal on the Unusual Staying Power of Pamela More

Agent of Influence: The Secret Life of Pamela More is the story of a high-society fashion journalist recruited by MI5 to facilitate the abdication of King Edward VIII. Broadway Baby’s James T Harding met playwright Sarah Sigal to learn more about holding seances with fictional characters, the nature of theatrical collaboration, and her family’s multigenerational conspiracy theory. Continue Reading

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