Dreaming of Leaves

Quirky, vibrant and oozing with dark imagination, Dreaming of Leaves is a daring and thought-provoking piece of theatre. Set in a dystopian future in which the earth has been flooded, the play tells the story of four people who have stayed behind on the ruined remains of Earth. Piece by piece, the audience is told about their pasts, their relationships and learns fragments of information as to how they came to be.

Tara Kearney’s direction has a nice flow overall and aids the story smoothly in switching from childlike, happy moments to the much darker and more emotive scenes

This is an inarguably well-crafted piece of theatre. Tara Kearney’s direction has a nice flow overall and aids the story smoothly in switching from childlike, happy moments to the much darker and more emotive scenes. The element of physical theatre is particularly nice and incredibly well placed in the piece. Kearney has done well not to overuse it, meaning that the occasional moments that are more physical and stylised are stand-outs. The piece of movement between June and Otto when they have tied their shoelaces together is particularly touching.

The cast are very strong as a whole. Matilda Mallinson’s June is feisty and powerful and is strongest in the more upbeat moments. June’s character is complex, and Mallinson does well to have the audience sympathise with her, even in moments when her character is cruel or angry. Aladdin, played by Johnny Ben-Shaul is possibly the most likeable character and Ben-Shaul’s performance promotes this even further. Jake Morris’ Otto is incredibly sweet but also manages to bring ann element of fire to the character.

The music throughout the piece is beautiful and all performed by Margerhita Lolecci as the Piano Player. Her presence on the stage has a huge impact, which is particularly admirable considering her part is silent.

Overall, the play is excellent. There are some clumsy moments here and there that distract slightly from the action, with bits of set and props getting in the way or falling. But, despite it being slightly rough around the edges, this is a truly moving piece of theatre that has been put together with some gorgeously creative touches.

Reviews by Hayley Sophie Scott

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Performances

Location

The Blurb

Set in the post apocalypse, a strange family inhabit a derelict hilltop church. The rest of earth is submerged under water. Believing that all the birds fell from the sky in the summer of 2053, Otto is amazed to find a winged creature during an expedition to find food. Sudden joy is experienced by the church residents, and they decide to teach it to fly. The complexity of hope in a world where reality has little tangibility is slowly revealed.